A close-up of a flowering  Banksia.
 

PACIFIC SIGHTS

To walk down the grand sidewalks of Broadway Street is to take a stroll through the layers of San Francisco’s history. The renowned Pacific Heights neighborhood hosts homes from each epoch of the city, punctuated by glimpses of the Golden Gate Bridge. The landscape design for the newest home on the street needed to fulfill all of the sustainability requirements for LEED Platinum certification, while extending the luxury of the architecture by Taylor Lombardo Architects.

The front garden was planted with low-water trees to provide privacy for the ground floor. We extended the planting area into the right of way to add more green space and two new street trees to the neighborhood.

The architects designed balconies and large windows at angles off the four top floors of the house to frame views of the Golden Gate Bridge to the northwest and of the cityscape to the northeast. The geometry of the garden below extends those lines to draw the eye toward the bridge and the Pacific Ocean beyond, while providing a strong visual presence from the highest floors. Low-water plantings frame the hardscape to create a pleasant space for entertaining or enjoying the view from the hot tub.

Three 1,500 gallon rainwater catchment tanks underneath the back garden supply all the water for the irrigation of the lush, layered plantings, exceeding expectations of what a drought-tolerant landscape could be.

The result is a landscape that looks visually stunning from above, fulfills the strictest sustainability codes in the country, and is a fun and playful space.

PACIFIC SIGHTS

To walk down the grand sidewalks of Broadway Street is to take a stroll through the layers of San Francisco’s history. The renowned Pacific Heights neighborhood hosts homes from each epoch of the city, punctuated by glimpses of the Golden Gate Bridge. The landscape design for the newest home on the street needed to fulfill all of the sustainability requirements for LEED Platinum certification, while extending the luxury of the architecture by Taylor Lombardo Architects.

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To walk down the grand sidewalks of Broadway Street is to take a stroll through the layers of San Francisco’s history. The renowned Pacific Heights neighborhood hosts homes from each epoch of the city, punctuated by glimpses of the Golden Gate Bridge. The landscape design for the newest home on the street needed to fulfill all of the sustainability requirements for LEED Platinum certification, while extending the luxury of the architecture by Taylor Lombardo Architects.

The front garden was planted with low-water trees to provide privacy for the ground floor. We extended the planting area into the right of way to add more green space and two new street trees to the neighborhood.

The architects designed balconies and large windows at angles off the four top floors of the house to frame views of the Golden Gate Bridge to the northwest and of the cityscape to the northeast. The geometry of the garden below extends those lines to draw the eye toward the bridge and the Pacific Ocean beyond, while providing a strong visual presence from the highest floors. Low-water plantings frame the hardscape to create a pleasant space for entertaining or enjoying the view from the hot tub.

Three 1,500 gallon rainwater catchment tanks underneath the back garden supply all the water for the irrigation of the lush, layered plantings, exceeding expectations of what a drought-tolerant landscape could be.

The result is a landscape that looks visually stunning from above, fulfills the strictest sustainability codes in the country, and is a fun and playful space.

The sidewalk garden adds green space to the neighborhood and the glass and metal fence deliniates the private front yard.
Pavers and pebbles add geometry and movement to the front garden.
A detail photo shows spring green plantings and a powder-coated metal planter.
Geometrical forms add drama to the garden.
The view from the balcony towards the Palace of Fine Arts and across the bay is enhanced by the garden geometry.
A detail shot shows the interplay of the stone pavers, pebbles and low-water plantings.
The two axises follow the sight lines from the balconies.